test

Jack Horkheimer: Star Gazer

Star Gazer is the world's only weekly television series on naked eye astronomy. Each weekly episode features selected objects for naked eye viewing for the following week. This video podcast contains the 10 most recent episodes of Jack Horkheimer: Star Gazer.

FaviconStar Gazers 1 Min. Dec. 30, 2013- Jan 5, 2013 13 Nov 2013, 4:10 pm

Here Comes The Sun

(video/mpeg)

FaviconStar Gazers 5 Min. Dec. 30, 2013- Jan 5, 2013 13 Nov 2013, 4:09 pm

Here Comes The Sun

(video/mpeg)

FaviconStar Gazers 1 Min. Dec. 23-29, 2013 13 Nov 2013, 4:08 pm

Bye-Bye Venus,Good-bye And Celebrate The New Year With The New Year's Eve Star

(video/mpeg)

FaviconStar Gazers 5 Min. Dec. 23-29, 2013 13 Nov 2013, 4:06 pm

Bye-Bye Venus,Good-bye And Celebrate The New Year With The New Year's Eve Star

(video/mpeg)

FaviconStar Gazers 1 Min. Dec. 16-22, 2013 13 Nov 2013, 4:03 pm

Off To The Races With Venus And Jupiter

(video/mpeg)

Science @ NASA Feature Stories Podcast

The mission of Science@NASA is to help the public understand how exciting NASA research is and to help NASA scientists fulfill their outreach responsibilities.

FaviconGeminid Meteors Defy Explanation 9 Dec 2010, 3:00 pm

The annual Geminid meteor shower peaks this year on Dec. 13th and 14th. Researchers don't fully understand the Geminids, and new measurements make it more mysterious than ever.

Please vote for this podcast at PodcastAlley!

Get this podcast story.

(audio/mpeg; 3.66 MB)

Favicon"Arsenic-Bug" Redefines Life as We Know It 2 Dec 2010, 3:00 pm

NASA-supported researchers have discovered the first known microorganism on Earth able to thrive and reproduce using the toxic chemical arsenic. The microorganism, which lives in California's Mono Lake, substitutes arsenic for phosphorus in the backbone of its DNA.

Please vote for this podcast at PodcastAlley!

Get this podcast story.

(audio/mpeg; 3.66 MB)

FaviconAlien Comets Invade the Solar System 23 Nov 2010, 3:00 pm

Some of the comets in our Solar System probably came from other stars, according to new research by NASA-supported scientists. Studying these 'alien' comets, they say, could reveal new information about stellar systems far, far away.

Please vote for this podcast at PodcastAlley!

Get this podcast story.

(audio/mpeg; 3.66 MB)

FaviconHubble Observes Possible Asteroid Collision 13 Oct 2010, 2:00 am

NASA's Hubble Space Telescope has captured rare images of a suspected asteroid collision. The snapshots show a bizarre X-shaped object at the head of a comet-like trail of material. Their findings will be published in the Oct. 14th issue of Nature.

Please vote for this podcast at PodcastAlley!

Get this podcast story.

(audio/mpeg; 3.18 MB)

StarDate Online

FaviconWorld War II 2 Sep 2014, 1:00 am

AUDIO:[voice of Adolph Hitler...]

75 years ago today, Adolph Hitler was trying to explain to the world why Germany had invaded Poland just the day before.

ANNOUNCER: Poland, for the first time this evening, has shot at regular soldiers upon our territory....voice of Hitler...From now on, bomb will be met by bomb!

And it was. The following day, Britain and France declared war on Germany, marking the start of World War II.

It was a war in which science and technology would play crucial roles. Sonar and radar made it easier to detect enemy submarines and airplanes. Advances in aeronautics provided airplanes that could fly farther, higher, and faster. Analog computers helped decipher enemy codes. And working under some of the tightest security in history, nuclear physicists produced the weapon that eventually brought the war to an end: the atom bomb.

And after the war, many of those inventions quickened the pace of scientific discovery. Sonar helped scientists begin to map the ocean floor. Better aircraft provided platforms for studying the upper atmosphere. Computers allowed scientists to model some of the most complex phenomena in nature. And advances in nuclear physics helped provide a more complete picture of the structure and behavior of matter.

Astronomy played a role in the war effort as well, and it benefited from many of the war’s technological advances. We’ll have more about that tomorrow.

Script by Damond Benningfield, Copyright 2014


For more skywatching tips, astronomy news, and much more, read StarDate magazine.
The one constant in the Universe: StarDate magazine

FaviconPaper Black Holes 1 Sep 2014, 1:00 am

A scientific paper that was published 75 years ago doesn’t sound like much to get excited about. It was called “On Continued Gravitational Contraction.” Yet its conclusions were remarkable. It said that when a heavy star uses up the nuclear fuel in its core, gravity would squeeze it to an infinitely small point. To put it in more modern terms, the star would form a black hole.

The paper was written by J. Robert Oppenheimer, a physicist at the University of California, and a graduate student, Hartland Snyder.

At the time, scientists were just beginning to understand the process that powers stars, known as nuclear fusion. This process releases a lot of energy, which produces an outward pressure that prevents a star’s core from collapsing.

When fusion stops, though, there’s no more pressure to hold the core up, so gravity squashes it. Earlier studies had found that the cores of stars up to a few times the mass of the Sun would form ultra-dense “corpses” known as white dwarfs.

Oppenheimer and Snyder looked at what would happen to the heaviest stars of all. They found that once fusion shut down, gravity would cause the star to collapse to an infinitely dense point, and the star would vanish from sight.

The researchers couldn’t follow up on their work, though, because World War II intervened. Oppenheimer joined the war effort, and led the project that developed the first atomic bombs.

More about astronomy and World War II tomorrow.

 

Script by Damond Benningfield, Copyright 2014

For more skywatching tips, astronomy news, and much more, read StarDate magazine.
The one constant in the Universe: StarDate magazine

FaviconClearing the Gaps 31 Aug 2014, 1:00 am

Dark gaps separate the rings of Saturn in this 2009 image from the Cassini spacecraft. The gaps are cleared by the gravitational influence of small moons. (One of those moons, Epimetheus, casts a long shadow across the rings — the dark vertical streak at bottom center.) [NASA/JPL/SSI]

View of Saturn's rings from Cassini

Text ©2014 The University of Texas at Austin McDonald Observatory

For more skywatching tips, astronomy news, and much more, read StarDate magazine.
The one constant in the Universe: StarDate magazine

FaviconMoon and Planets 31 Aug 2014, 1:00 am

The weekend wraps up with a beautiful display in the evening sky tonight: a tight grouping of the Moon and the bright planets Mars and Saturn. Yellow-orange Mars is close to the lower left of the Moon at nightfall, with golden Saturn about the same distance to the lower right of the Moon.

If you look at Mars through a telescope, you may spot the planet’s white polar ice caps, plus some large patches of bright orange — regions that are covered with dust — and other patches of dark gray — bare volcanic rock.

The main feature you’d see at Saturn, though, is its broad rings — wide bands of ice, rock, and dust that shine as brightly as the planet itself. The inner edge of the rings is about 7500 miles above Saturn’s bright cloudtops, while the outer edge of the main rings is about 85,000 miles out.

There are several dark gaps in the rings. They’re cleared out by the gravity of small moons that orbit inside the rings. They’re not completely clear, though, so you probably wouldn’t want to try flying through them.

A couple of smaller rings encircle the main rings. One of them is braided like a loaf of challah bread. It’s twisted by the gravity of the moon Enceladus. Enceladus also feeds that ring. Geysers of water and ice shoot into space from the moon’s south pole. Some of that material feeds into the ring, keeping it young and fresh.

Again, look for Saturn and Mars near the Moon this evening — a pretty way to end the weekend.

Script by Damond Benningfield, Copyright 2014

For more skywatching tips, astronomy news, and much more, read StarDate magazine.
The one constant in the Universe: StarDate magazine

FaviconPanhu 30 Aug 2014, 1:00 am

A couple of ancient star patterns wheel low across the south on summer nights. The teapot of Sagittarius is due south at nightfall, with the wide triangle of Capricornus far to its left, in the southeast.

A tiny group of four faint stars stands about halfway between these two prominent patterns, on the western edge of Sagittarius. In western skylore, it’s named Terebellum, after one of the four stars. To Chinese skywatchers, though, these four stars are known as the Country of the Dogs.

Legend says that the ancient Emperor Ku was plagued by a warring tribe on China’s western frontier. He was so concerned about the threat that he offered a big reward, plus the hand of his daughter, the princess, to anyone who could rid him of the menace.

Upon hearing the offer, his almost-human dog Panhu immediately left the palace. Panhu was nowhere to be found for several months. Eventually, though, he returned — carrying the head of the enemy chieftain in his mouth. Ku was happy about getting rid of his rival, but unhappy about the way it happened.

Nevertheless, he married off his daughter to the dog and gave the couple an island that became known as Gouguo — “the Country of the Dogs.”

Panhu remains an important figure in the mythology of several ethnic groups of China and surrounding lands. It represents a country in Chinese legend in which all males are dogs and all females are humans.

Tomorrow: a beautiful way to wrap up the weekend.

Script by Robert Tindol and Paris Liu, Copyright 2014

For more skywatching tips, astronomy news, and much more, read StarDate magazine.
The one constant in the Universe: StarDate magazine

ESOcast HD

ESOcast is a video podcast series dedicated to bringing you the latest news and research from ESO, the European Southern Observatory. Here we explore the Universe's ultimate frontier with our host Doctor J, a.k.a. Dr. Joe Liske.

FaviconESOcast 66: A Groundbreaking Event for the E-ELT 2 Jul 2014, 9:00 am

On 19 June 2014, a major milestone on the road to the construction of the European Extremely Large Telescope was reached. Part of the 3000-metre peak of Cerro Armazones was blasted away as a step towards levelling the summit. This paves the way for the largest optical/infrared telescope in the world.

FaviconESOcast 65: The Chilean Sky in Ultra High Definition 30 May 2014, 12:00 pm

In the Spring of 2014, a team of ESO Photo ambassadors embarked on a pioneering expedition to ESO's three observatories in Chile. Their mission was to capture a wide range of images and time-lapses of the magnificent Chilean night sky and landscape in crisp Ultra High Definition. Join our heroes in their adventures in the arid Atacama Desert as they bring our Universe closer than ever before.

FaviconESOcast 64: First Ring System Around Asteroid 26 Mar 2014, 2:00 pm

This ESOcast shows how observations at many sites in South America, including ESO's La Silla Observatory, have made the surprise discovery that the remote asteroid Chariklo is surrounded by two dense and narrow rings.

FaviconESOcast 63: Flexible Giants — The Evolution of Telescope Mirrors 19 Feb 2014, 5:00 am

The clear night sky offers one of the most beautiful views in nature. The eye adapts to the dark and the pupil widens to collect more light and thus allow fainter stars to become visible. But the light-collecting area of the human eye is tiny. To peer much deeper into the night sky astronomers need telescopes with enormous primary mirrors to do a much better job.

FaviconESOcast 62: Three planets found in star cluster 15 Jan 2014, 6:00 am

In this ESOcast we look at how astronomers have used ESO's HARPS planet hunter in Chile, along with other telescopes around the world, to discover three planets orbiting stars in the cluster Messier 67. Although more than one thousand planets outside the Solar System are now confirmed, only a handful have been found in star clusters. Remarkably one of these new exoplanets is orbiting a star that is a rare solar twin — a star that is almost identical to the Sun in all respects.

HD - NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory

High-definition (HD) videos from NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory feature the latest news on space and science findings from JPL and NASA. Topics include discoveries made by spacecraft studying planets in our solar system, including Mars, Saturn and our home planet, Earth. Missions also study stars and galaxies in our universe.

FaviconWhat's Up - September 2014 29 Aug 2014, 3:00 am



Red star(Antares) meets red planet(Mars) and view a zodiacal light that points towards Jupiter.



FaviconThe Rosetta Mission Asks: What Can We Learn From Comets? 27 Aug 2014, 3:00 am



The Rosetta mission will give us an unprecedented look inside a comet, watching the icy traveler become active as it nears the sun.



FaviconHigh-Def Video of NASA's 'Flying Saucer' Test 7 Aug 2014, 3:00 am



LDSD principal investigator Ian Clark takes us through a play-by-play of NASA's 'Flying Saucer' Test in Hawaii.



FaviconThe Rosetta Mission Asks: What is a Comet? 6 Aug 2014, 3:00 am



Scientists attempt to answer questions and more as the Rosetta Mission's Orbiter arrives and escorts comet 67/p Churyumov Gerasimenko into our inner solar system.



FaviconCuriosity Rover Report (Aug. 5, 2014): A Softer Trek to Mount Sharp 5 Aug 2014, 3:00 am



On the second anniversary of NASA Curiosity on Mars, the rover navigates a sandy valley on its way to Mount Sharp.