Frost Science

FaviconFrost Science@Home: Science Spotlight Videos 27 Mar 2020, 9:51 am

To keep children engaged and learning, Frost Science partnered with Celebrity Cruises for STEM at Sea, an innovative Camp at Sea program onboard the Celebrity Equinox. In addition. Frost Science also produced a series of engaging Science Spotlight videos for Galápagos sailings. The videos are featured on the Celebrity Flora, the first ship of its kind to be built especially for the Galápagos Islands.

As part of our Frost Science@Home digital platform, Celebrity Cruises and Frost Science are proud to present these videos for your at-home viewing. Click below and get your dose of inspiration!

Science Spotlight: Coral Reefs

In partnership with Celebrity Cruises, this Science Spotlight video features Dr. Rivah Winter, former Curator of Aquarium Content & Marine Science at the Phillip and Patricia Frost Museum of Science. Dive into the diverse and majestic world of coral reefs, the rainforests of the sea. Discover how they eat, their essential role in supporting a biodiverse ocean, and what scientists are doing to help save them.



 

Science Spotlight: Invasive Invaders

In partnership with Celebrity Cruises, this Science Spotlight video features Andy Dehart, Vice President of Animal Husbandry & Marine Conservation at the Phillip and Patricia Frost Museum of Science. Uncover the growing threat caused by invasive species throughout natural ecosystems worldwide through the story of lionfish in the Atlantic Ocean. Then, learn about the conservation efforts already underway to help save our oceans, including those led by Frost Science.

 

Science Spotlight: Nature’s Biodiversity

In partnership with Celebrity Cruises, this Science Spotlight video features Shannon C. Jones, Conservation Programs Manager at the Phillip and Patricia Frost Museum of Science. Behold the beauty and wonder of nature’s biodiversity, from genes and microorganisms, to habitats and ecosystems. Discover the growing impact humans are making on our diverse ecosystems and conservation efforts underway at Frost Science to restore Miami’s coastlines.

 

Science Spotlight: The Hidden Benefits of Nature

In partnership with Celebrity Cruises, this Science Spotlight video features Daniella Orihuela, MPH, Director of Educational Programs at the Phillip and Patricia Frost Museum of Science. Explore how nature can improve your overall health and well-being, simply by being in it. Learn what happens to your body when you are stressed and how nature can play an important role in decreasing it.



 

Science Spotlight: The Search for Sharks

In partnership with Celebrity Cruises, this Science Spotlight video features Dr. Demian Chapman, a lead scientist of the Global FinPrint project and Associate Professor in the Department of Biological Sciences at Florida International University. Travel throughout the world in this video to join the search for sharks, to learn how these top predators in the ocean act as indicators of overall ecosystem health.



 

Science Spotlight: The Secret Life of Sea Stars

In partnership with Celebrity Cruises, this Science Spotlight video features Summer Gagel, an aquarist at the Phillip and Patricia Frost Museum of Science. Did you ever wonder about the secret life of sea stars? With over 2,000 species of sea stars living throughout the world’s oceans, scientists are working to learn even more about them and the interesting life that they live.



With the museum closed due to COVID-19, we are losing admission and event revenue that we so heavily rely on. Please consider making a tax-deductible donation to help offset the cost of animal care and virtual programming during this difficult time. All donations, however small, will have an immediate impact.

Donate Now

For questions on different ways to support Frost Science, please contact advancement@frostscience.org

The post Frost Science@Home: Science Spotlight Videos appeared first on Frost Science.

FaviconFrost Science@Home: Video Conference Backgrounds 26 Mar 2020, 4:57 pm

As we all look to stay ‘Together At Home’ during this unprecedented crisis, staying connected via web and video conferencing is more popular than ever. Millions are also working from home and using platforms such as Zoom for virtual meetings and events.

Surprise your friends and coworkers with these special Frost Science@Home video conference backgrounds, now available for download. Jazz up your chat backgrounds and it’ll look like you’re at Frost Science, from our iconic Gulf Stream Oculus to our state-of-the-art Frost Planetarium.

Here’s how to change your background on Zoom: First, find your favorite background photos below and save them to your desktop. Then, on Zoom, click the gear settings in the upper right corner. Click “Virtual Background” from the bar on the left, then press the plus sign to upload the photo of your choice.

If you use one, be sure to tag us at @frostscience and #FrostScienceatHome.

Feathers to the Stars Exhibition

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Frost Planetarium

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Gulf Stream Oculus

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Interactive Media Wall in Aquarium Deep

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Royal Caribbean Vista – Aquarium

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Phillip and Patricia Frost Museum of Science – Aerial View

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With the museum closed due to COVID-19, we are losing admission and event revenue that we so heavily rely on. Please consider making a tax-deductible donation to help offset the cost of animal care and virtual programming during this difficult time. All donations, however small, will have an immediate impact.

Donate Now

For questions on different ways to support Frost Science, please contact advancement@frostscience.org

The post Frost Science@Home: Video Conference Backgrounds appeared first on Frost Science.

FaviconFrost Science Supports Global COVID-19 Research Efforts 25 Mar 2020, 1:58 pm

Frost Science is contributing to global scientific research efforts to fight diseases such as COVID-19 (Coronavirus) by enabling the use of its powerful, state-of-the-art Frost Planetarium computer servers through an innovative platform run by the University of California, Berkeley, with support from the National Science Foundation.

The Berkeley Open Infrastructure for Network Computing (BOINC) is a volunteer, crowdsourced computing platform that downloads scientific computing jobs to remote computers and runs programs in an effort to advance important research.

Frost Science is giving BOINC researchers access to the servers of the museum’s state-of-the-art Frost Planetarium for use in the critical Rosetta@home (R@h) project from the University of Washington. The Frost Planetarium, which utilizes the innovative Sky-Skan technology system, is one of the most advanced planetariums in the world, as one of the few 8K planetariums in the world. The museum is making available for the R@h project the Frost Planetarium’s Dell PowerEdge 7910 servers, consisting of 168 processors, Dell SC Centralized Data Storage and Nvidia Quadra M6000 graphics cards.

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The R@h project is looking to help accurately model important coronavirus proteins and predict their three-dimensional shapes. The collective computing power provided will assist academic research groups worldwide as they model protein structures. Proteins are the molecular machines and building blocks of life. Knowledge gained from studying these viral proteins is now being used to guide the design of novel vaccines and antiviral drugs. Along with COVID-19, the Frost Planetarium system will also be helping efforts at designing new proteins to fight diseases such as HIV, malaria, cancer and Alzheimer’s.

“As a leading scientific institution, we wanted to find a way to repurpose the powerful computing technology we had idle with our closure. We are now actively supporting groundbreaking research that will help us solve some of the world’s biggest challenges, such as COVID-19. Now more than ever, we need to work together and keep science and high quality research at the forefront of our thinking. We encourage others to join our Frost Science BOINC team and help make a difference, right from their homes” said Frank Steslow, Frost Science President & CEO.

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About 30 science projects that investigate diseases, clean energy and many other types of scientific research use BOINC, including LHC@home which runs simulations to improve the design of the Large Hadron Collider, the world’s largest particle physics laboratory, sponsored by CERN (European Organization for Nuclear Research).

With the museum closed due to COVID-19, we are losing admission and event revenue that we so heavily rely on. Please consider making a tax-deductible donation to help offset the cost of animal care and virtual programming during this difficult time. All donations, however small, will have an immediate impact.

Donate Now

For questions on different ways to support Frost Science, please contact advancement@frostscience.org

The post Frost Science Supports Global COVID-19 Research Efforts appeared first on Frost Science.

FaviconFrost Science@Home: Meet Miko, Our Loggerhead Turtle 23 Mar 2020, 10:26 am

She weighs 135 lbs. and is over 20 years old. Meet our rehabilitated loggerhead turtle, Miko, and learn more about sea turtles in this Frost Science@Home post. When you visit Frost Science, you can see Miko in our iconic Gulf Stream Exhibit.

Top Five Facts About Miko

      1. Miko weighs 135 lbs. and is believed to be around 20 to 30 years old (but nobody knows for certain!).
      2. Miko was rescued by staff at Gulfarium Marine Adventure Park in the Florida Panhandle near Pensacola for ingesting fishing gear. They rehabilitated the turtle and released it three times. The third time she moved to the East Coast of Florida but made her way back to the Panhandle, becoming a return patient once again for eating fishing gear. The Florida Fish and Wildlife Commission (FWC) deemed that Miko could no longer be released into the wild so Frost Science is now her permanent home.
      3. Miko generally eats once a day.
      4. We make sure Miko takes all the necessary vitamins, minerals and calories a sea turtle needs to thrive.
      5. At least once a year, Miko receives a full physical examination to ensure she is healthy, inside and out.

Top Five Facts About Sea Turtles

      1. There are seven different species of sea turtles, six of which—green, hawksbill, Kemp’s ridley, leatherback, loggerhead and olive ridley—can be found throughout the ocean, in both warm and cool waters. The seventh species, the flatback, lives only in Australia.
      2. Sea turtles live a long time (some can live up to 50 years or more!) and have similar lifespans to humans. Most marine turtles take decades to mature—between 20 and 30 years—and remain actively reproductive for another 10 years.
      3. Worldwide, six of the seven sea turtle species are classified as threatened or endangered due to human actions and lifestyles. Accidental capture by fishing gear, which often results in death, is the greatest threat to most sea turtles. Climate change also impacts sea turtle nesting beaches and eggs.
      4. Depending on the species, sea turtles have a broad diet that includes jellyfish, crabs, shrimp, snails, mollusks and sponges. Green turtles like their greens: adult greens are the only herbivorous sea turtles and eat seagrass and algae to survive.
      5. Sea turtles will migrate thousands of miles over their lifetimes to eat, breed and lay their eggs. One female leatherback even clocked a 12,000-mile roundtrip journey across the Pacific Ocean! Turtles have a special tool to navigate these epic voyages—an internal GPS using the earth’s magnetic field. Just as sailors use latitude and longitude to navigate the high seas, turtles sense slight variations in the planet’s magnetic field and are able to pinpoint specific coastlines based on their magnetic signature. That’s how many females are able to return to the exact beach where they were born to lay their eggs.

With the museum closed due to COVID-19, we are losing admission and event revenue that we so heavily rely on. Please consider making a tax-deductible donation to help offset the cost of animal care and virtual programming during this difficult time. All donations, however small, will have an immediate impact.

Donate Now

For questions on different ways to support Frost Science, please contact advancement@frostscience.org

The post Frost Science@Home: Meet Miko, Our Loggerhead Turtle appeared first on Frost Science.

FaviconFrost Science@Home: Learning Resources & Activities 23 Mar 2020, 2:51 am

Keep the learning going and the kids engaged! As part of our Frost Science@Home digital learning platform, this page will be your go-to resource link for DIY science, at-home science activities, step-by-step videos and more that you can try with your family at home.

The page will continue to stay updated with new information. You can also follow us on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram where we’ll be posting regular updates and behind-the-scenes content. Please share it with your family and friends, and tag us at #FrostScienceAtHome!

 

Activity Videos & Resources

March 2020 Stargazing

Behold the wonders of the nightsky from your own backyard! Use this guide to understand how the Earth’s rotation and the position of the Sun determines when stars become visible while finding stars and constellations in the sky above you.

  • March 2020 Stargazing Activity Toolkit. Click Here


 

Friction Fun

Discover the force of friction by creating ramps made of different materials and then seeing which one allows your racecar to go the fastest.



 

Soap Putty

Get hands-on and a little messy as you investigate polymers, including what it is, what it is made of, and how we interact with them every day by creating your own soap putty.



 

Additional At-Home Resources

Dino Fossils

Explore how dinosaur tracks can still be discovered by scientists today, despite dinosaurs going extinct millions of years ago, by making your very own imprint fossil. This is a great activity for children five and under.

River Fractals

Discover the beauty and simplicity of naturally occurring branching fractals by creating your own paper watershed model.

 

Additional Resources

  • Smithsonian – Distance Learning. Click Here
  • How Things Fly – Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum. Click Here
  • Game Center – Smithsonian Science Education Center. Click Here
  • Live Science – Educational activities for homebound kids. Click Here
  • Association of Science & Technology Centers (ASTC) – Educational resources. Click Here
  • Ology – A science website for kids from the American Museum of Natural History. Click Here
  • Curriculum Collections – American Museum of Natural History. Click Here
  • Courses & Specializations – American Museum of Natural History. Click Here

With the museum closed due to COVID-19, we are losing admission and event revenue that we so heavily rely on. Please consider making a tax-deductible donation to help offset the cost of animal care and virtual programming during this difficult time. All donations, however small, will have an immediate impact.

Donate Now

For questions on different ways to support Frost Science, please contact advancement@frostscience.org

The post Frost Science@Home: Learning Resources & Activities appeared first on Frost Science.

StarDate Online - Your guide to the universe

FaviconMars and Saturn 30 Mar 2020, 2:00 am

The planets Mars and Saturn are forming a tight pair in the early morning sky. They are low in the southeast at first light, to the lower left of brilliant Jupiter. Tomorrow, Mars will stand a little below Saturn.

FaviconMars and Saturn 30 Mar 2020, 1:00 am

The planets Mars and Saturn don’t have a lot in common. Mars is small, dense, and rocky. Saturn probably has a rocky core, but most of it is made up of gas. So while Saturn is many times larger than Mars, it’s the “fluffiest” planet in the solar system.

One possible similarity, though, is rings. Saturn is encircled by wide, beautiful rings. Mars doesn’t have any rings today, but it could have had them in the distant past — and might again millions of years in the future.

Saturn’s rings probably formed when a small moon was pulverized. The moon might have passed too close to Saturn and was pulled apart by Saturn’s gravity. Or it might have been shattered by a collision with another body.

Mars could have been smacked by a smaller object billions of years ago, creating its own rings. Some of that debris might have coalesced to form the planet’s moons, Phobos and Deimos.

Phobos is only 3700 miles above the Martian surface. And it’s sliding closer — by about six feet per century. In 50 million years or so, it’ll either crash into Mars, or be pulled apart by the planet’s gravity — creating a new ring.

Mars and Saturn are forming a tight pair in the early morning sky. They’re low in the southeast at first light, to the lower left of brilliant Jupiter. Tomorrow, Mars will stand a little below Saturn. After that, Mars will slide away from Saturn. In a few days, that’ll break up the pairing of these quite-different siblings.


Script by Damond Benningfield

StarDate: 
Monday, March 30, 2020
Teaser: 
Two planets “ring in” the dawn

FaviconArneb 29 Mar 2020, 2:00 am

Arneb, the leading light of the constellation Lepus, the hare, is in the southwest as night falls, below brilliant Orion. Arneb is roughly 14 times the mass of the Sun. Such heavy stars burn out quickly, then explode as supernovae.

FaviconArneb 29 Mar 2020, 1:00 am

With every breath, you’re inhaling the “ash” from a nuclear furnace — nitrogen and oxygen created by a star. Many stars are making more of these elements today, and will someday expel them into space — perhaps to fill the skies of future planets.

One star that’s made a lot of nitrogen is Arneb, the leading light of the constellation Lepus, the hare. It’s in the southwest as night falls, below brilliant Orion.

Arneb is roughly 14 times the mass of the Sun. Such heavy stars “burn” through the hydrogen fuel in their cores in a hurry. They smash together the hydrogen to make helium. But they do it in a different way from stars like the Sun.

The Sun makes helium directly by fusing the nuclei of hydrogen atoms — bare protons. But stars like Arneb use a catalyst: carbon, which is present in small amounts when the star is born.

In a series of steps, the carbon fuses with hydrogen to make nitrogen, followed by a heavier form of carbon. This carbon then splits apart. That yields helium plus the type of carbon that started the whole thing. So hydrogen is converted to helium, while the carbon is still around to continue the process.

In Arneb, some of the nitrogen created in this sequence has survived. It’s mixed with the star’s outer layers. Arneb eventually will blast the nitrogen and other elements created inside the star out into space. That will seed the galaxy with the ingredients for new stars, planets — and planetary atmospheres.

 

Script by Damond Benningfield

StarDate: 
Sunday, March 29, 2020
Teaser: 
Breathing the “ash” of dead stars

FaviconMoon and Venus II 28 Mar 2020, 2:00 am

Venus, the brilliant “evening star,” teams with the crescent Moon to put on a great show this evening. They are well up in the sky at nightfall, and don’t set until shortly before midnight.

ESOcast HD

ESOcast is a video podcast series dedicated to bringing you the latest news and research from ESO, the European Southern Observatory. Here we explore the Universe's ultimate frontier.

FaviconESOcast 218: The Stranger Exoplanets 11 Mar 2020, 12:00 pm

What are the strangest exoplanets ever found or studied with ESO telescopes? Watch this ESOcast to find out.

FaviconESOcast 217 Light: ESO Telescope Sees Surface of Dim Betelgeuse 14 Feb 2020, 8:00 am

Using ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT), astronomers have captured the unprecedented dimming of Betelgeuse, a red supergiant star in the constellation Orion.

FaviconESOcast 216 Light: ALMA Catches Beautiful Outcome of Stellar Fight 5 Feb 2020, 6:00 am

Astronomers using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA), in which ESO is a partner, have spotted a peculiar gas cloud that resulted from a confrontation between two stars. Find out more about this stellar fight in this ESOcast Light.

FaviconESOcast 215 Light: Interstellar Thread of One of Life’s Building Blocks Revealed 15 Jan 2020, 6:00 am

Phosphorus, present in our DNA and cell membranes, is an essential element for life. But how it arrived on the early Earth is something of a mystery. Astronomers have now traced the journey of phosphorus from star-forming regions to comets using the combined powers of ALMA and the European Space Agency’s probe Rosetta.

FaviconESOcast 214 Light: A Black Holes' Breakfast at the Cosmic Dawn 19 Dec 2019, 6:00 am

Astronomers using ESO's Very Large Telescope have observed reservoirs of cool gas around some of the earliest galaxies in the Universe. Watch this video to find out why this discovery is important.

HD - NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory

High-definition (HD) videos from NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory feature the latest news on space and science findings from JPL and NASA. Topics include discoveries made by spacecraft studying planets in our solar system, including Mars, Saturn and our home planet, Earth. Missions also study stars and galaxies in our universe.

FaviconWhat's Up - February 2020 4 Feb 2020, 3:00 am



What are the skywatching highlights of February 2020?



FaviconNASA's Spitzer Space Telescope: Unveiling the Universe 15 Jan 2020, 3:00 am



After 16 years of unveiling the infrared universe, NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope has left a singular legacy.



FaviconNASA's New Planet Tracker, NEID 8 Jan 2020, 3:00 am



A new NASA-funded planet-hunting instrument has been installed on the WIYN telescope, on Arizona’s Kitt Peak.



FaviconWhat's Up - January 2020 31 Dec 2019, 3:00 am



What are the skywatching highlights of January 2020?



FaviconFirst Drive Test of NASA’s Mars 2020 Rover 18 Dec 2019, 3:00 am



On Dec. 17, 2019, engineers took NASA’s next Mars rover for its first spin.