test

ASNH Events for April

ASNH Events

Meetings and Outreach Events















View the Full Calendar


25
There are 163 days left until CSP 25
September 11 - 13, 2015

NASA Whats Up for April

NASACast: What's Up? Video Podcasts

What's Up? -- A monthly video that gives tips for where you can find the moon, planets and stars in the night sky. Also includes amateur astronomy news and updates on NASA missions.

FaviconWhat's Up - March 2015

Posted on: 4 Mar 2015, 11:00 am


A total solar eclipse in the North Atlantic and tips to prepare for the next U.S. eclipse.





ESO European Southern Observatory ESOcast

ESOcast SD

ESOcast is a video podcast series dedicated to bringing you the latest news and research from ESO, the European Southern Observatory. Here we explore the Universe's ultimate frontier with our host Doctor J, a.k.a. Dr. Joe Liske.

FaviconESOcast 73: Your ESO Pictures

Posted on: 19 Mar 2015, 7:00 am


ESOcast 73 looks at the "Your ESO Pictures" Flickr group, where amateurs and professionals alike contribute their photos related to ESO.





Hubblecast

Hubblecast HD

The latest news about astronomy, space and the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope presented in High Definition is only for devices that play High Definition video (not iPhone or iPod). To watch the Hubblecast on your iPod and/or iPhone, please download the Standard Definition version also available on iTunes.

FaviconHubblecast 83: A cosmic double act — Hubble meets James Webb

Posted on: 19 Mar 2015, 11:00 am


As Hubble enters its 25th year in orbit, with celebrations planned around the world for its anniversary on 24 April 2015, this Hubblecast celebrates the relationship that the telescope will have with its future colleague, the James Webb Space Telescope.





CBS New Sunday Morning article Preserving the starry starry night

NASA News

NASA Ames Research Center - News and Features

Ames News RSS

FaviconWorkshop on Planetary Protection Knowledge Gaps for Human Extraterrestrial Missions 24 Mar 2015, 12:00 am

Ames Research Center and the SETI Institute will co-host a workshop on Planetary Protection Knowledge Gaps for Human Extraterrestrial Missions on March 24-26, 2015.

FaviconKepler Wins National Air and Space Museum Trophy 23 Mar 2015, 12:00 am

NASA's Kepler mission team will receive the Smithsonian's National Air and Space Museum's highest group honor at a ceremony in Washington on March 25.

FaviconNASA Ames Reproduces the Building Blocks of Life in Laboratory 3 Mar 2015, 12:00 am

NASA scientists studying the origin of life have reproduced uracil, cytosine, and thymine, three key components of our hereditary material, in the laboratory.

FaviconTechnical Workshop on the Potential for Finding Life in a Europa Plume 18 Feb 2015, 12:00 am

On February 18, 2015, the NASA Astrobiology Institute and the Solar System Exploration Research Virtual Institute will co-host a workshop at NASA's Ames Research Center.

Astronomy News

Space.com News Feed

Favicon Blood Moon: Shortest Total Lunar Eclipse of the Century Rises Saturday

Only the speediest of skywatchers will have a chance to see the total lunar eclipse rising Saturday (April 4): NASA predicts that the total phase of the lunar eclipse will only last about 5 minutes.

Favicon Mars Orbiter Checks In On Curiosity Parts | Video

The Mars Science Laboratory and components of the delivery spacecraft whence it came have been spied by the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter on several occasions since in August 2012.

Favicon Solar System Planets: Order of the 8 (or 9) Planets

There used to be nine planets. Now there are eight. Whichever you prefer, here is a list of them in the order they appear in the solar system.

Favicon SETI Has New Infrared Telescope Tech in Search for E.T.

It is called NIROSETI for near-infrared optical SETI. This new instrument can record levels of light over time so that patterns can be analyzed and assessed for potential signs of other civilizations.

Favicon Why The Moon Turns 'Blood' Red During Eclipse | Video

In the early morning hours of April 4th 2015, a total lunar eclipse will be visible from many parts of the world. But why will the moon appear dark red? Science@NASA explains.

APOD for Today

APOD

Astronomy Picture of the Day

FaviconCorona from Svalbard 

Corona from Svalbard Corona from Svalbard


FaviconA Flag Shaped Aurora over Sweden 

It appeared, momentarily, like a 50-km tall banded flag. It appeared, momentarily, like a 50-km tall banded flag.


FaviconShadow of a Martian Robot 

What if you saw your shadow on Mars and it wasn't What if you saw your shadow on Mars and it wasn't


FaviconDiamond Rings and Baily's Beads 

Near the March 20 equinox the cold clear sky over Longyearbyen, Near the March 20 equinox the cold clear sky over Longyearbyen,


FaviconNGC 2403 in Camelopardalis 

Magnificent island universe Magnificent island universe


NASA Image Of The Day

NASA Image of the Day

The latest NASA "Image of the Day" image.

FaviconPushing the Boundaries of Propelling Deep Space Missions 31 Mar 2015, 12:00 pm

Engineers at NASA’s Glenn Research Center are advancing the propulsion system that will propel the first ever mission to redirect an asteroid for astronauts to explore in the 2020s.  NASA's Asteroid Redirect Mission will test a number of new capabilities, like advanced Solar Electric Propulsion (SEP), needed for future astronaut expeditions into deep space, including to Mars. The Hall thruster is part of an SEP system that uses 10 times less propellant than equivalent chemical rockets. In a recent test, engineers from Glenn and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, using a Glenn vacuum chamber to simulate the space environment, successfully tested a new, higher power Hall thruster design, which is more efficient and has longer life. “We proved that this thruster can process three times the power of previous designs and increase efficiency by 50 percent,” said Dan Herman, Electric Propulsion Subsystem lead. Hall thrusters trap electrons in a magnetic field and use them to ionize the onboard propellant. The magnetic field also generates an electric field that accelerates the charged ions creating an exhaust plume of plasma that pushes the spacecraft forward. This method delivers cost-effective, safe and highly efficient in-space propulsion for long duration missions. In addition to propelling an asteroid mission, this new thruster could be used to send large amounts of cargo, habitats and other architectures in support of human missions to Mars. Image Credit: NASA Michelle M. Murphy (Wyle Information Systems, LLC)

FaviconHubble Views a Galaxy on Edge 30 Mar 2015, 12:00 pm

This NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope image shows an edge-on view of the spiral galaxy NGC 5023. Due to its orientation we cannot appreciate its spiral arms, but we can admire the elegant profile of its disk. The galaxy lies over 30 million light-years away from us. NGC 5023 is part of the M51 group of galaxies. The brightest galaxy in this group is Messier 51, the Whirlpool Galaxy, which has been captured by Hubble many times. NGC 5023 is less fond of the limelight and seems rather unsociable in comparison — it is relatively isolated from the other galaxies in the group. Astronomers are particularly interested in the vertical structure of disks like these. By analyzing the structure above and below the central plane of the galaxy they can make progress in understanding galaxy evolution. Astronomers are able to analyze the distribution of different types of stars within the galaxy and their properties, in particular how well evolved they are on the Hertzsprung–Russell Diagram — a scatter graph of stars that shows their evolution. NGC 5023 is one of six edge-on spiral galaxies observed as part of a study using Hubble’s Advanced Camera for Surveys. They study this vertical distribution and find a trend which suggests that heating of the disc plays an important role in producing the stars seen away from the plane of the galaxy. In fact, NGC 5023 is pretty popular when it comes to astronomers, despite its unsociable behavior. The galaxy is also one of 14 disk galaxies that are part of the GHOSTS survey — a survey which uses Hubble data to study galaxy halos, outer disks and star clusters. It is the largest study to date of star populations in the outskirts of disk galaxies. The incredible sharp sight of Hubble has allowed scientist to count more than 30,000 individual bright stars in this image. This is only a small fraction of the several billion stars that this galaxy contains, but the others are too faint to detect individually even with Hubble. European Space Agency Credit: ESA/NASA

FaviconBoarding the Soyuz Spacecraft on Launch Day 27 Mar 2015, 12:00 pm

Expedition 43 Russian cosmonaut Mikhail Kornienko of the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos), top, NASA astronaut Scott Kelly, center, and Russian cosmonaut Gennady Padalka of Roscosmos wave farewell as they board the Soyuz TMA-16M spacecraft ahead of their launch to the International Space Station, Friday, March 27, 2015 in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. Kelly and Kornienko will spend a year in space and return to Earth on Soyuz TMA-18M in March 2016. Most expeditions to the space station last four to six months. By doubling the length of this mission, researchers hope to better understand how the human body reacts and adapts to long-duration spaceflight. This knowledge is critical as NASA looks toward human journeys deeper into the solar system, including to and from Mars, which could last 500 days or longer. The Soyuz is set to lift off at 3:42 p.m. EDT, Friday, March 27 on a six-hour, four-orbit flight to the station. Image Credit: NASA/Bill Ingalls

FaviconYear in Space Begins With Soyuz Launch 27 Mar 2015, 12:00 pm

Media photograph the Soyuz TMA-16M spacecraft as it launches to the International Space Station with Expedition 43 NASA astronaut Scott Kelly, Russian cosmonauts Mikhail Kornienko and Gennady Padalka of the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos) onboard at 3:42 p.m. EDT Friday, March 27, 2015 (March 28 Kazakh time) from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. As the one-year crew, Kelly and Kornienko will return to Earth on Soyuz TMA-18M in March 2016. Image Credit: NASA/Bill Ingalls

FaviconSoyuz Spacecraft Rolled Out For Launch of One-Year Crew 26 Mar 2015, 12:00 pm

The Soyuz TMA-16M spacecraft is seen after having rolled out by train to the launch pad at the Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan, Wednesday, March 25, 2015. NASA astronaut Scott Kelly and Russian cosmonauts Mikhail Kornienko and Gennady Padalka of the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos) are scheduled to launch to the International Space Station in the Soyuz at 3:42 p.m. EDT, Friday, March 27 (March 28, Kazakh time). As the one-year crew, Kelly and Kornienko will return to Earth on the Soyuz TMA-18M in March 2016. Most expeditions to the space station last four to six months. By doubling the length of this mission, researchers hope to better understand how the human body reacts and adapts to long-duration spaceflight. This knowledge is critical as NASA looks toward human journeys deeper into the solar system, including to and from Mars, which could last 500 days or longer. More: A Year in Space Image Credit: NASA/Bill Ingalls

Faces of the Moon A new book by ASNH member Bob Crelin Click the book below for information on the book

There Once Was A Sky Full Of Stars A new book by ASNH member Bob Crelin Click the book below for information on the book

The 100 Best Targets for Astrophotography A new book by ASNH member Ruben Kier Click the book below for a review from Springer.com

Cosmic Perspective Radio Shows


Host
Andy Poniros
Cosmic Perspective Radio Shows
The 4th Saturday of the month from 9-11am
Listen Live