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September 26 - 28, 2014

ASNH Events for August

ASNH Events

Meetings and Outreach Events

Favicon ASNH BOD Meeting

When: Tue Aug 5, 2014 7pm to Tue Aug 5, 2014 9pm  EDT

Where: Bethany Observing Station
Event Status: confirmed

Favicon Ansonia Nature Center

When: Sat Aug 9, 2014 8pm to 11pm  EDT

Event Status: confirmed

Favicon ASNH General Meeting (Will resume in October)

When: Tue Aug 26, 2014 7pm to Tue Aug 26, 2014 9pm  EDT

Where: Yale Leitner Student Observatory
Event Status: confirmed
Event Description: The general membership meetings are open to the public and attendance is encouraged.

NASA News

NASA Ames Research Center - News and Features

Ames News RSS

FaviconOpen House 2014 - NASA's Ames Research Center 18 Oct 2014, 12:00 am

Save the Date: Oct. 18, 2014 -- the first Ames Open House in 17 years!

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FaviconNew NASA Research Shows Giant Asteroids Battered Early Earth 30 Jul 2014, 12:00 am

New research shows that more than four billion years ago the surface of Earth was heavily reprocessed – or melted, mixed, and buried – as a result of giant asteroid impacts.

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FaviconAreas of Ames Ingenuity: Entry Systems 18 Jul 2014, 12:00 am

Entry Systems are the complete package of heat shields, parachutes, software, and other articles needed for a vehicle to successfully transition from space to operations in the atmosphere of a planet or land on other planets.

FaviconNASA Ames Cargo Launches to Space Station aboard Orbital Sciences Resupply Mission 14 Jul 2014, 12:00 am

A multitude of NASA research investigations, crew provisions, hardware and science experiments from across the country is headed to the International Space Station aboard Orbital Sciences Corp.'s Cygnus spacecraft. The cargo craft launched aboard Orbital's Antares rocket from NASA's Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia at 9:52 a.m. PDT Sunday.

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FaviconOuter Space to Inner Space: SOFIA Inside Lufthansa Technik Hangar 11 Jul 2014, 12:00 am

NASA personnel along with Lufthansa 747SP specialists to perform a wide range of inspections and major maintenance over the next few months.

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Astronomy News

SPACE.com

Something amazing every day.

Favicon'Starship View' of Earth and Moon Captured by NASA Jupiter Probe (Video) 10 Dec 2013, 4:45 pm

Display the item's primary content. NASA's Juno spacecraft captured an amazing "starship-like view" of Earth and the moon as it made a speedy flyby past our planet on its way to Jupiter in October.

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FaviconHi Juno! Ham Radio Operators Call NASA’s Jupiter Spacecraft | Video 10 Dec 2013, 3:28 pm

Display the item's primary content. See how amateur ham radio operators beamed messages to NASA’s Jupiter-bound Juno spacecraft during its Earth flyby of Oct. 9, 2013. Did their morse code messages of hello reach Juno?

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FaviconRobonaut 2, NASA's Humanoid Space Robot, Will Get Legs Soon (Video) 10 Dec 2013, 3:11 pm

Display the item's primary content. NASA's robotic astronaut helper is getting its space legs. The space agency is developing two lower limbs for Robonaut 2, a robot designed to eventually help astronauts with tasks on the International Space Station.

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FaviconStarship-Style Earth Fly-By From Jupiter-Bound Probe | Video 10 Dec 2013, 2:54 pm

Display the item's primary content. This cosmic pirouette of Earth and our moon was captured by the Juno spacecraft as it flew by Earth on Oct. 9, 2013. Set be inserted into Jupiter orbit in August 2016.

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FaviconSaturn’s Strange Vortex | Space Wallpaper 10 Dec 2013, 2:16 pm

Display the item's primary content. This colorful space wallpaper from NASA's Cassini mission is the highest-resolution view of the unique six-sided jet stream at Saturn's north pole known as "the hexagon." Image obtained on Dec. 10, 2012 and released Dec. 4, 2013.

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APOD for Today

APOD

Astronomy Picture of the Day

FaviconTetons and Snake River, Planet Earth 

Tetons and Snake River, Planet Earth Tetons and Snake River, Planet Earth


FaviconVeins of Heaven 

Veins of Heaven Veins of Heaven


FaviconM31: The Andromeda Galaxy 

Andromeda is the nearest major Andromeda is the nearest major


FaviconA Sky Portal in New Zealand 

To some, it may look like a portal into the distant universe. To some, it may look like a portal into the distant universe.


FaviconThe Horsehead Nebula from Blue to Infrared 

One of the most identifiable nebulae in the sky, One of the most identifiable nebulae in the sky,


NASA Image Of The Day

NASA Image of the Day

The latest NASA "Image of the Day" image.

FaviconFirst Image of the Moon Taken by a U.S. Spacecraft 31 Jul 2014, 12:00 pm

Ranger 7 took this image, the first picture of the moon by a U.S. spacecraft, on July 31, 1964 at 13:09 UT (9:09 AM EDT), about 17 minutes before impacting the lunar surface. The area photographed is centered at 13 S, 10 W and covers about 360 km from top to bottom. The large crater at center right is the 108 km diameter Alphonsus. Above it is Ptolemaeus and below it Arzachel. The terminator is at the bottom right corner. Mare Nubium is at center and left. North is at about 11:00 at the center of the frame. The Ranger 7 impact site is off the frame, to the left of the upper left corner.  The Ranger series of spacecraft were designed solely to take high-quality pictures of the moon and transmit them back to Earth in real time. The images were to be used for scientific study, as well as selecting landing sites for the Apollo moon missions. Ranger 7 was the first of the Ranger series to be entirely successful. It transmitted 4,308 high-quality images over the last 17 minutes of flight, the final image having a resolution of 0.5 meter/pixel. Ranger 7 was launched July 28, 1964 and arrived at the moon on July 31, 1964. > Moon Mission 50-Year Anniversary: A Vintage Look Back Image Credit: NASA

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FaviconNext-Generation Microshutter Array Technology 30 Jul 2014, 12:00 pm

NASA technologists have hurdled a number of significant challenges in their quest to improve a revolutionary observing technology originally created for the James Webb Space Telescope. This image shows a close-up view of the next-generation microshutter arrays -- designed to accommodate the needs of future observatories -- during the fabrication process. Determined to make the Webb telescope's microshutter technology more broadly available, a team of technologists at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center spent the past four years experimenting with techniques to advance this capability. One of the first things the team did was eliminate the magnet that sweeps over the shutter arrays to activate them, replacing it with electrostatic actuation. Just as significant is the voltage needed to actuate the arrays. By last year, the team had achieved a major milestone by activating the shutters with just 30 volts. The team used atomic layer deposition, a state-of-the-art fabrication technology, to fully insulate the tiny space between the electrodes to eliminate potential electrical crosstalk that could interfere with the arrays’ operation. They also applied a very thin anti-stiction coating to prevent the shutters from sticking when opened. > Revolutionary Microshutter Technology Hurdles Significant Challenges Image Credit: NASA/Bill Hrybyk

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FaviconSolar Dynamics Observatory Captures Images of Lunar Transit 29 Jul 2014, 12:00 pm

On July 26, 2014, from 10:57 a.m. to 11:42 a.m. EDT, the moon crossed between NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) and the sun, a phenomenon called a lunar transit. A lunar transit happens approximately twice a year, causing a partial solar eclipse that can only be seen from SDO's point of view. Images of the eclipse show a crisp lunar horizon, because the moon has no atmosphere that would distort light. This image shows the blended result of two SDO wavelengths - one in 304 wavelength and another in 171 wavelength. Image Credit: NASA/SDO

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FaviconTethys in Sunlight 28 Jul 2014, 12:00 pm

Tethys, like many moons in the solar system, keeps one face pointed towards the planet around which it orbits. Tethys' anti-Saturn face is seen here, fully illuminated, basking in sunlight. On the right side of the moon in this image is the huge crater Odysseus. The Odysseus crater is 280 miles (450 kilometers) across while Tethys is 660 miles (1,062 kilometers) across. See PIA07693 for a closer view and more information on the Odysseus crater. This view looks toward the anti-Saturn side of Tethys. North on Tethys is up and rotated 33 degrees to the right. The image was taken in visible light with the Cassini spacecraft narrow-angle camera on June 15, 2013. The view was acquired at a distance of approximately 503,000 miles (809,000 kilometers) from Tethys. Image scale is 3 miles (5 kilometers) per pixel. The Cassini-Huygens mission is a cooperative project of NASA, the European Space Agency and the Italian Space Agency. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages the mission for NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Washington, D.C. The Cassini orbiter and its two onboard cameras were designed, developed and assembled at JPL. The imaging operations center is based at the Space Science Institute in Boulder, Colo. For more information about the Cassini-Huygens mission visit http://www.nasa.gov/cassini and http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov . The Cassini imaging team homepage is at http://ciclops.org . Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute

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FaviconNASA's Webb Sunshield Stacks Up to Test! 25 Jul 2014, 12:00 pm

The Sunshield on NASA's James Webb Space Telescope is the largest part of the observatory—five layers of thin membrane that must unfurl reliably in space to precise tolerances. Last week, for the first time, engineers stacked and unfurled a full-sized test unit of the Sunshield and it worked perfectly. The Sunshield is about the length of a tennis court, and will be folded up like an umbrella around the Webb telescope’s mirrors and instruments during launch. Once it reaches its orbit, the Webb telescope will receive a command from Earth to unfold, and separate the Sunshield's five layers into their precisely stacked arrangement with its kite-like shape. The Sunshield test unit was stacked and expanded at a cleanroom in the Northrop Grumman facility in Redondo Beach, California. The Sunshield separates the observatory into a warm sun-facing side and a cold side where the sunshine is blocked from interfering with the sensitive infrared instruments. The infrared instruments need to be kept very cold (under 50 K or -370 degrees F) to operate.   The Sunshield protects these sensitive instruments with an effective sun protection factor or SPF of 1,000,000 (suntan lotion generally has an SPF of 8-50). In addition to providing a cold environment, the Sunshield provides a thermally stable environment. This stability is essential to maintaining proper alignment of the primary mirror segments as the telescope changes its orientation to the sun. The James Webb Space Telescope is the successor to NASA's Hubble Space Telescope. It will be the most powerful space telescope ever built. Webb is an international project led by NASA with its partners, the European Space Agency and the Canadian Space Agency. For more information about the Webb telescope, visit:  www.jwst.nasa.gov or www.nasa.gov/webb For more information on the Webb Sunshield, visit:  http://jwst.nasa.gov/sunshield.html Photo Credit: NASA/Chris Gunn Rob Gutro NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center

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Faces of the Moon A new book by ASNH member Bob Crelin Click the book below for information on the book

There Once Was A Sky Full Of Stars A new book by ASNH member Bob Crelin Click the book below for information on the book

The 100 Best Targets for Astrophotography A new book by ASNH member Ruben Kier Click the book below for a review from Springer.com

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