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September 26 - 28, 2014

CBS News Sunday Morning article Preserving the starry starry night

ASNH Events for August

ASNH Events

Meetings and Outreach Events

Favicon ASNH BOD Meeting

When: Tue Aug 5, 2014 7pm to Tue Aug 5, 2014 9pm  EDT

Where: Bethany Observing Station
Event Status: confirmed

Favicon Ansonia Nature Center

When: Sat Aug 9, 2014 8pm to 11pm  EDT

Event Status: confirmed

Favicon Members Only Observing At Ansonia Nature Center

When: Sat Aug 16, 2014 7pm to Sat Aug 16, 2014 11pm  EDT

Where: Ansonia Nature Center 10 Deerfield Ln Ansonia CT 06401
Event Status: confirmed

Favicon Members Only Observing At Ansonia Nature Center (Rain Date)

When: Sat Aug 23, 2014 7pm to Sat Aug 23, 2014 11pm  EDT

Where: Ansonia Nature Center 10 Deerfield Ln Ansonia CT 06401
Event Status: confirmed

Favicon Members Only Observing At Ansonia Nature Center (Rain Date)

When: Sat Aug 23, 2014 7pm to Sat Aug 23, 2014 11pm  EDT

Where: Ansonia Nature Center 10 Deerfield Ln Ansonia CT 06401
Event Status: confirmed

Favicon ASNH General Meeting (Will resume in October)

When: Tue Aug 26, 2014 7pm to Tue Aug 26, 2014 9pm  EDT

Where: Yale Leitner Student Observatory
Event Status: confirmed
Event Description: The general membership meetings are open to the public and attendance is encouraged.

NASA News

NASA Ames Research Center - News and Features

Ames News RSS

FaviconOpen House 2014 - NASA's Ames Research Center 18 Oct 2014, 12:00 am

Save the Date: Oct. 18, 2014 -- the first Ames Open House in 17 years!

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FaviconKepler Mission Manager Update: K2 collecting data 8 Aug 2014, 12:00 am

K2, the two-wheel operation mode of Kepler, officially began collecting data on May 30 and performance has been spectacular.

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FaviconNASA Ames Team Conducts Field Campaign Events in Idaho 6 Aug 2014, 12:00 am

The The Field Investigations to Enable Solar System Science and Exploration (FINESSE) team's first field campaign from July 29 to August 8, 2014 will include a media opportunity.

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FaviconARC Capabilities 30 Jul 2014, 12:00 am

FaviconNew NASA Research Shows Giant Asteroids Battered Early Earth 30 Jul 2014, 12:00 am

New research shows that more than four billion years ago the surface of Earth was heavily reprocessed – or melted, mixed, and buried – as a result of giant asteroid impacts.

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Astronomy News

SPACE.com

Something amazing every day.

Favicon'Starship View' of Earth and Moon Captured by NASA Jupiter Probe (Video) 10 Dec 2013, 4:45 pm

Display the item's primary content. NASA's Juno spacecraft captured an amazing "starship-like view" of Earth and the moon as it made a speedy flyby past our planet on its way to Jupiter in October.

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FaviconHi Juno! Ham Radio Operators Call NASA’s Jupiter Spacecraft | Video 10 Dec 2013, 3:28 pm

Display the item's primary content. See how amateur ham radio operators beamed messages to NASA’s Jupiter-bound Juno spacecraft during its Earth flyby of Oct. 9, 2013. Did their morse code messages of hello reach Juno?

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FaviconRobonaut 2, NASA's Humanoid Space Robot, Will Get Legs Soon (Video) 10 Dec 2013, 3:11 pm

Display the item's primary content. NASA's robotic astronaut helper is getting its space legs. The space agency is developing two lower limbs for Robonaut 2, a robot designed to eventually help astronauts with tasks on the International Space Station.

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FaviconStarship-Style Earth Fly-By From Jupiter-Bound Probe | Video 10 Dec 2013, 2:54 pm

Display the item's primary content. This cosmic pirouette of Earth and our moon was captured by the Juno spacecraft as it flew by Earth on Oct. 9, 2013. Set be inserted into Jupiter orbit in August 2016.

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FaviconSaturn’s Strange Vortex | Space Wallpaper 10 Dec 2013, 2:16 pm

Display the item's primary content. This colorful space wallpaper from NASA's Cassini mission is the highest-resolution view of the unique six-sided jet stream at Saturn's north pole known as "the hexagon." Image obtained on Dec. 10, 2012 and released Dec. 4, 2013.

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APOD for Today

APOD

Astronomy Picture of the Day

FaviconMilky Way over Yellowstone 

The Milky Way was not created by an evaporating lake. The Milky Way was not created by an evaporating lake.


FaviconFlying Past Neptunes Moon Triton 

What would it look like to fly past Triton, the largest moon of planet Neptune? What would it look like to fly past Triton, the largest moon of planet Neptune?


FaviconArp 188 and the Tadpoles Tail 

Why does this galaxy have such a long tail?   Why does this galaxy have such a long tail?


FaviconMercurys Transit: An Unusual Spot on the Sun 

What's that dot on the Sun? What's that dot on the Sun?


FaviconThe Spectre of Veszprem 

The city of Veszprem, Hungary was only briefly haunted by The city of Veszprem, Hungary was only briefly haunted by


NASA Image Of The Day

NASA Image of the Day

The latest NASA "Image of the Day" image.

FaviconSolar Dynamics Observatory Captures Images of a Late Summer Flare 26 Aug 2014, 12:00 pm

On Aug. 24, 2014, the sun emitted a mid-level solar flare, peaking at 8:16 a.m. EDT. NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory captured images of the flare, which erupted on the left side of the sun. Solar flares are powerful bursts of radiation. Harmful radiation from a flare cannot pass through Earth's atmosphere to physically affect humans on the ground, however -- when intense enough -- they can disturb the atmosphere in the layer where GPS and communications signals travel. This flare is classified as an M5 flare. M-class flares are ten times less powerful than the most intense flares, called X-class flares. Image Credit: NASA/SDO

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Favicon25 Years Ago, Voyager 2 Captures Images of Neptune 25 Aug 2014, 12:00 pm

NASA's Voyager 2 spacecraft gave humanity its first glimpse of Neptune and its moon Triton in the summer of 1989. This picture of Neptune was produced from the last whole planet images taken through the green and orange filters on the Voyager 2 narrow angle camera. The images were taken on Aug. 20, 1989, at a range of 4.4 million miles from the planet, 4 days and 20 hours before closest approach on Aug. 25. The picture shows the Great Dark Spot and its companion bright smudge; on the west limb the fast moving bright feature called "Scooter" and the little dark spot are visible. These clouds were seen to persist for as long as Voyager's cameras could resolve them. North of these, a bright cloud band similar to the south polar streak may be seen. In the summer of 2015, another NASA mission to the farthest zone of the solar system, New Horizons, will make a historic first close-up study of Pluto. Although a fast flyby, New Horizons' Pluto encounter on July 14, 2015, will not be a replay of Voyager but more of a sequel and a reboot, with a new and more technologically advanced spacecraft and, more importantly, a new cast of characters. Those characters are Pluto and its family of five known moons, all of which will be seen up close for the first time next summer. Image Credit: NASA

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FaviconBack Shell Tile Panels Installed on NASA's Orion Spacecraft 22 Aug 2014, 12:00 pm

Inside the Operations and Checkout Building high bay at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, technicians dressed in clean-room suits have installed a back shell tile panel onto the Orion crew module and are checking the fit next to the middle back shell tile panel. Preparations are underway for Exploration Flight Test-1, or EFT-1. Orion is the exploration spacecraft designed to carry astronauts to destinations not yet explored by humans, including an asteroid and Mars. It will have emergency abort capability, sustain the crew during space travel and provide safe re-entry from deep space return velocities. The first unpiloted test flight of the Orion is scheduled to launch later this year atop a Delta IV rocket from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida to an altitude of 3,600 miles above the Earth's surface. The two-orbit, four-hour flight test will help engineers evaluate the systems critical to crew safety including the heat shield, parachute system and launch abort system. > Engineers and Technicians Install Protective Shell on NASA’s Orion Spacecraft Image Credit: NASA/Dimitri Gerondidakis

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FaviconSupernova Seen In Two Lights 21 Aug 2014, 12:00 pm

The destructive results of a mighty supernova explosion reveal themselves in a delicate blend of infrared and X-ray light, as seen in this image from NASA’s Spitzer Space Telescope and Chandra X-Ray Observatory, and the European Space Agency's XMM-Newton. The bubbly cloud is an irregular shock wave, generated by a supernova that would have been witnessed on Earth 3,700 years ago. The remnant itself, called Puppis A, is around 7,000 light-years away, and the shock wave is about 10 light-years across. The pastel hues in this image reveal that the infrared and X-ray structures trace each other closely. Warm dust particles are responsible for most of the infrared light wavelengths, assigned red and green colors in this view. Material heated by the supernova’s shock wave emits X-rays, which are colored blue. Regions where the infrared and X-ray emissions blend together take on brighter, more pastel tones. The shock wave appears to light up as it slams into surrounding clouds of dust and gas that fill the interstellar space in this region. From the infrared glow, astronomers have found a total quantity of dust in the region equal to about a quarter of the mass of our sun. Data collected from Spitzer’s infrared spectrograph reveal how the shock wave is breaking apart the fragile dust grains that fill the surrounding space. Supernova explosions forge the heavy elements that can provide the raw material from which future generations of stars and planets will form. Studying how supernova remnants expand into the galaxy and interact with other material provides critical clues into our own origins. Infrared data from Spitzer’s multiband imaging photometer (MIPS) at wavelengths of 24 and 70 microns are rendered in green and red. X-ray data from XMM-Newton spanning an energy range of 0.3 to 8 kiloelectron volts are shown in blue. Credit: NASA/ESA/JPL-Caltech/GSFC/IAFE

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FaviconRetreat of Yakutat Glacier 20 Aug 2014, 12:00 pm

Located in the Brabazon Range of southeastern Alaska, Yakutat Glacier is one of the fastest retreating glaciers in the world. It is the primary outlet for the 810-square kilometer (310-square mile) Yakutat ice field, which drains into Harlequin Lake and, ultimately, the Gulf of Alaska. The Operational Land Imager on the Landsat 8 satellite captured this image of the glacier and lake on Aug. 13, 2013. Snow and ice appear white and forests are green. The brown streaks on the glaciers are lateral and medial moraines. Over the past 26 years, the glacier’s terminus has retreated more than 5 kilometers (3 miles). What is causing the rapid retreat? University of Alaska glaciologist Martin Truffer and colleagues pointed to a number of factors in their 2013 study published in the Journal of Glaciology. The chief cause is the long-term contraction of the Yakutat Ice Field, which has been shrinking since the height of the Little Ice Age. Once part of a much larger ice field, Yakutat has been contracting for hundreds of years. As other nearby glaciers retreated, Yakutat ice field was cut off from higher-elevation areas that once supplied a steady flow of ice from the north. With that flow cut off, there simply is not enough snow falling over the low-elevation Yakutat ice field to prevent it from retreating. Beyond this natural change, human-caused global warming has hastened the speed of the retreat. Between 1948–2000, mean annual temperatures in Yakutat increased by 1.38° Celsius (2.48° Fahrenheit). Between 2000 and 2010, they rose by another 0.48°C (0.86°F). The warmer temperatures encourage melting and sublimation at all ice surfaces exposed to the air. In the past few years, the breakdown of a long, floating ice tongue has triggered especially dramatic changes in the terminus of Yakutat glacier. For many years, Yakutat’s two main tributaries merged and formed a 5-kilometer (3-mile) calving face that extended far into Harlequin Lake. In the past decade, satellites observed a rapid terminus retreat and the breakup of the ice tongue in 2010. As a result, the calving front divided into two sections, with one running east-west and another running north-south.  > More information and annotated images Image Credit: NASA Earth Observatory image by Robert Simmon, using Landsat data from the U.S. Geological Survey Caption: Adam Voiland

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Faces of the Moon A new book by ASNH member Bob Crelin Click the book below for information on the book

There Once Was A Sky Full Of Stars A new book by ASNH member Bob Crelin Click the book below for information on the book

The 100 Best Targets for Astrophotography A new book by ASNH member Ruben Kier Click the book below for a review from Springer.com

Cosmic Perspective Radio Shows


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